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stopkillinggames.com

Arnox

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Founder
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5,384
Ross Scott said:
USA: You're fucked.
Yeah, pretty much. State level right-to-repair laws may be the savior we actually should pursue though in connection to this. Two frags with one railgun shot.
 

Arnox

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Founder
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5,384
Right-to-repair tackles hardware though
Games are software. USA peeps are screwed there
For one, that's an old court case. Second, right-to-repair must, by necessity, include at least some software provisions as well or else companies are just going to do malicious compliance and serialize every part or just straight up add DRM to everything. Oregon, I believe, already passed a law banning parts serialization. Right-to-repair is also, and must also be, right-to-own.
 
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Vendor-Lazarus

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Sanctuary legend
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This is the first actual description of what "stopkillinggames" is.. and I agree completely. Live Service and Always Online DRM are abominations. More acceptable is MMO, if described as such in the initial phases of alpha/beta. Unless they turn a Singleplayer game into Multiplayer only. Then I'm pissed again. Anyway, I hope the petitions make their way through.
 

Gauche

Arch Disciple
Messages
685
Second Wind did a video covering it for sake of signal boosting

Can't believe they still don't have a website
Fun to see escapist forum posters in the comments and sorta sad at the same time
 

Vendor-Lazarus

Arch Disciple
Sanctuary legend
Messages
964
Second Wind did a video covering it for sake of signal boosting

Can't believe they still don't have a website
Fun to see escapist forum posters in the comments and sorta sad at the same time
Having sites is so yesterday. Just having a youtube channel and a discord group and a patreon is enough don't you know.
 

Arnox

Master
Staff member
Founder
Messages
5,384
Having sites is so yesterday. Just having a youtube channel and a discord group and a patreon is enough don't you know.
And if you have a forum, delete it! Fuck those years of archived information and conversations. :) The plebs can go on Twitter.
 

Gauche

Arch Disciple
Messages
685
Australia petition is open
https://www.aph.gov.au/e-petitions/petition/EN6080

Canada petition is open
https://www.ourcommons.ca/petitions/en/Petition/Details?Petition=e-4965

Ross Scott on a podcast with Yahtzee
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KsTMS9o1xE0

Accursed Farms got a shout out on Gamer Nexus
https://youtu.be/7ndPSA5Kc5Y?t=1503

---

UK petition got a response

UK Government said:
Those selling games must comply with UK consumer law. They must provide clear information and allow continued access to games if sold on the understanding that they will remain playable indefinitely.
The Government recognises recent concerns raised by video games users regarding the long-term operability of purchased products.
Consumers should be aware that there is no requirement in UK law compelling software companies and providers to support older versions of their operating systems, software or connected products. There may be occasions where companies make commercial decisions based on the high running costs of maintaining older servers for video games that have declining user bases. However, video games sellers must comply with existing consumer law, including the Consumer Rights Act 2015 (CRA) and the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 (CPRs).
The CPRs require information to consumers to be clear and correct, and prohibit commercial practices which through false information or misleading omissions cause the average consumer to make a different choice, for example, to purchase goods or services they would not otherwise have purchased. The regulations prohibit commercial practices which omit or hide information which the average consumer needs to make an informed choice, and prohibits traders from providing material information in an unclear, unintelligible, ambiguous or untimely manner. If consumers are led to believe that a game will remain playable indefinitely for certain systems, despite the end of physical support, the CPRs may require that the game remains technically feasible (for example, available offline) to play under those circumstances.
The CPRs are enforced by Trading Standards and the Competition and Markets Authority. If consumers believe that there has been a breach of these regulations, they should report the matter in the first instance to the Citizens Advice consumer helpline on 0808 223 1133 (www.citizensadvice.org.uk). People living in Scotland should contact Advice Direct Scotland on 0808 164 6000 (www.consumeradvice.scot). Both helplines offer a free service advising consumers on their rights and how best to take their case forward. The helplines will refer complaints to Trading Standards services where appropriate. Consumers can also pursue private redress through the courts where a trader has provided misleading information on a product.
The CRA gives consumers important rights when they make a contract with a trader for the supply of digital content. This includes requiring digital content to be of satisfactory quality, fit for a particular purpose and as described by the seller. It can be difficult and expensive for businesses to maintain dedicated support for old software, particularly if it needs to interact with modern hardware, apps and websites, but if software is being offered for sale that is not supported by the provider, then this should be made clear.
If the digital content does not meet these quality rights, the consumer has the right to a repair or replacement of the digital content. If a repair or replacement is not possible, or does not fix the problem, then the consumer will be entitled to some money back or a price reduction which can be up to 100% of the cost of the digital content. These rights apply to intangible digital content like computer software or a PC game, as well as digital content in a tangible form like a physical copy of a video game. The CRA has a time limit of up to six years after a breach of contract during which a consumer can take legal action.
The standards outlined above apply to digital content where there is a contractual right of the trader or a third party to modify or update the digital content. In practice, this means that a trader or third party can upgrade, fix, enhance and improve the features of digital content so long as it continues to match any description given by the trader and continues to conform with any pre-contract information including main characteristics, functionality and compatibility provided by the trader, unless varied by express agreement.
Consumers should also be aware that while there is a statutory right for goods (including intangible digital content) to be of a satisfactory quality, that will only be breached if they are not of the standard which a reasonable person would consider to be satisfactory, taking into account circumstances including the price and any description given. For example, a manufacturer’s support for a mobile phone is likely to be withdrawn as they launch new models. It will remain usable but without, for example, security updates, and over time some app developers may decide to withdraw support.

Department Culture, Media & Sport
Ross no likey
 
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